Protein Computational Tools: Mathematical Data Modeling Solutions Print
Written by Virginia Gonzalez   
Thursday, 09 December 2010 17:56
Join industry experts as they share how mathematical modeling systems are enabling biotherapeutic research. Register Today!

Inaugural
Protein Computational Tools
Mathematical Data Modeling Solutions

January 13-14, 2011   Download Final Agenda     Register Today!


Part of CHI's 10th Annual PepTalk 2011 - The Protein Science Week | January 10-14, 2011 | Hotel Del Coronado | San Diego, CA | www.chi-peptalk.com

Computational life science modeling has emerged as an important tool from academic research to advance industrial applications which support strategic decision making throughout the protein production pipeline.  High-throughput technologies are producing reliable and quantitative data that aid engineering methods to model complex biological systems.  This meeting provides the opportunity for protein scientists, engineers, and chemists generating data, computer engineers and bioinformaticists modeling data, and drug developers, formulators, and bioprocessors utilizing the data models to foster discussion and drive production strategies in this dynamic research discipline.   

Agenda at a Glance

Thursday, January 13

FEATURED SPEAKERS:
FROM PROTEIN STRUCTURE TO FUNCTION
High-Throughput Computational Strategies for Proteomics
Philip E. Bourne, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego; Associate Director, Protein Data Bank; Editor-in-Chief, PLoS Computational Biology

Defining the Role of Proteases and Modulating their Activity in Complex Biological Systems Using Computational Methods
Charles S. Craik, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Biochemistry & Biophysics; Director, Chemistry and Chemical Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco

Drug & Vaccine Development from Envelope Glycoproteins to GPCRs
Mark R. Chance, Ph.D., Director, Center for Bioinformatics and Proteomics, Case Western Reserve University

FROM RATIONAL DESIGN TO BIOTHERAPY

Plastic Antibodies: The Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Synthetic Polymer Biomacromolecular Receptors
Kenneth Shea, Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry, University of California, Irvine

Protein Stabilization by the Rational Design of Surface Charge-Charge Interactions
George Makhatadze, Ph.D., Professor, Biocomputation, Biology, Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Panel Discussion with Speakers
Computational biology develops and uses efficient algorithms, data structures, visualization and communication tools to manage the integration of large quantities of protein data with the goal of computer modeling. Experts from this interdisciplinary field share how mathematical modeling systems are enabling biotherapeutic research.

Panelists:
Philip E. Bourne, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego
Mark R. Chance, Ph.D., Director, Center for Bioinformatics and Proteomics, Case Western Reserve University
Charles S. Craik, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco
George Makhatadze, Ph.D., Professor, Biocomputation, Biology, Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Kenneth Shea, Ph.D., Professor, Chemistry, University of California, Irvine

Friday, January 14

FROM COMPUTERS TO THE CLINIC

Designing Countermeasures to the Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor Using Topomeric Searching
Elizabeth A. Amin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Medicinal Chemistry; Associate Fellow, Minnesota Supercomputing Institute for Advanced Computational Research, University of Minnesota
 
The Implications of Patterns in HIV Diversity for Neutralizing Antibody Induction and Susceptibility
S. Gnana Gnanakaran, Ph.D., Scientist, Theoretical Biology & Biophysics, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Using the Immune Epitope Database for Epitope Prediction and Analysis
Bjoern Peters, Ph.D., Assistant Member, Center for Infectious Disease, Allergy and Asthma Research, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

Poster Awards in the Exhibit Hall

Computational Prediction of B-Cell and T-Cell Epitopes
Vasant Honavar, Ph.D., Professor, Computer Science, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Iowa State University

Drug Repurposing Using Structural-Based Systems Biology
Lei Xie, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, The City University of New York; Research Scientist, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego

FROM MODELING TO PREDICTING PROTEIN AGGREGATION

Comparability Assessments with Biopharmaceutical Dosage Forms: Analytical Challenges and Opportunities
David B. Volkin, Ph.D., Takeru and Aya Higuchi Distinguished Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas

Structure-Based Design of Therapeutic Antibodies for Improved Developability
Sandeep Kumar, Ph.D., Principal Scientist, Global Biologics, Pfizer

A Chemometric Approach towards Assessing the Aggregation Propensity of Polypeptides
Mark Manning, Ph.D., CSO, Legacy BioDesign

Foldit: Video Games for Scientific Discovery in Biochemistry
Seth Cooper, Ph.D. Candidate, Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington

End of Conference

Click here for detailed abstracts  |  Register
Protein Computational Tools is part of "Pipeline 2: Analytics of Process Improvement"

Pipeline 2: Analytics of Process Improvement follows protein production from beginning to end and back again.  The continual process of refining steps and evaluating analytical data provides a guide for optimization, thus enhancing quality and reducing bottom-line costs.  The decisions made along this analytical route perpetually distill processes to achieve greater productivity and consistency.

3rd Annual
Protein Purification & Recovery
January 10-11                Inaugural
Protein Data Integration and Interrogation
January 12-13                Inaugural
Protein Computational Tools
January 13-14

Package pricing is available to attend the entire pipeline!  Register Today

SHORT COURSES*

Sunday, January 9 | 3:00 - 6:00pm
- Characterization and Analysis of Particulates
- Protein Crystallization - Delineating Protein Structure
- DoE and QbD: Tools for Optimizing the Bioprocess
 
Tuesday Dinner Courses, January 11 | 4:30 - 7:30pm
- Dynamic Light Scattering - Theory, Do's & Don'ts, and Data Interpretation
- De-Risking Your Pipeline: Strategies to Optimize Protein Leads, Reduce Immune Responses
  and Improve Drug Lead Attrition Rates
- Affecting Effector Functions to Optimize the Efficacy of Therapeutic Antibodies

Thursday Dinner Course, January 13 | 6:30 - 9:00 pm
- Rational Design of Protein Solutions
 
Click here for detailed information on the Short Courses.     *Separate registration required